Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Johnson v. Sharpe

United States District Court, S.D. Mississippi, Southern Division

March 14, 2014

TROY S. JOHNSON, Plaintiff,
v.
PAUL SHARPE, ET AL., Defendants.

OPINION AND ORDER

MICHAEL T. PARKER, Magistrate Judge.

THIS MATTER is before the Court on the Defendants' Motion for Summary Judgment [37]. Having reviewed the submissions of the parties and the applicable law, the Court finds that the Motion [37] should be granted in part and denied in part.

FACTUAL BACKGROUND

On October 23, 2012, Plaintiff Troy S. Johnson, proceeding pro se and in forma pauperis, filed his complaint pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983. In his complaint and asF clarified by his testimony at the Spears [1] hearing, Plaintiff alleges a claim against Paul Sharpe for excessive force in violation of the Eighth Amendment and alleges claims against Ron King for failing to properly investigate the July 11, 2012, incident, and for failing to grant him any relief through the Administrative Remedy Program (ARP). See Omnibus Order [32]. Plaintiff's claims occurred while he was a post-conviction inmate at the South Mississippi Correctional Institution ("SMCI"), where he is currently incarcerated. Plaintiff seeks compensatory and punitive damages, as well as injunctive relief. On October 1, 2012, Defendants Sharpe and King moved for summary judgment.

STANDARD

This Court may grant summary judgment only if, viewing the facts in a light most favorable to Plaintiff, the Defendants demonstrate that there is no genuine issue of material fact and that they are entitled to judgment as a matter of law. Woods v. Smith, 60 F.3d 1161, 1164 (5th Cir. 1995). If Defendants fail to discharge the burden of showing the absence of a genuine issue concerning any material fact, summary judgment must be denied. John v. Louisiana, 757 F.2d 698, 708 (5th Cir. 1985). The existence of an issue of material fact is a question of law that this Court must decide, and in making that decision, it must "draw inferences most favorable to the party opposing the motion, and take care that no party will be improperly deprived of a trial of disputed factual issues." John, 757 F.2d at 708, 712.

However, there must be adequate proof in the record showing a real controversy regarding material facts. "Conclusory allegations, "[2] the presence of a "scintilla of evidence, "[3] or unsubstantiated assertions, [4] are not enough to create a real controversy regarding material facts. "[T]he mere existence of some alleged factual dispute between the parties will not defeat an otherwise properly supported motion for summary judgment; the requirement is that there be no genuine issue of material fact." Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 247-48 (1986). In the absence of proof, the court does not "assume that the nonmoving party could or would prove the necessary facts." Little v. Liquid Air Corp., 37 F.3d 1069, 1075 (5th Cir. 1994) (emphasis omitted).

ANALYSIS

It is well-settled that Section 1983 does not "create supervisory or respondeat superior liability." Oliver v. Scott, 276 F.3d 736, 742 & n.6 (5th Cir. 2002); see also Thompkins v. Belt, 828 F.2d 298, 304 (5th Cir. 1987). Supervisory prison officials may be held liable for a Section 1983 violation only if they either were personally involved in the constitutional deprivation or if there is a "sufficient causal connection between the supervisor's wrongful conduct and the constitutional violation." Thompkins, 828 F.2d at 304; see also Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 129 S.Ct. 1937, 1948 (2009) ("Because vicarious liability is inapplicable to Bivens and § 1983 suits, a plaintiff must plead that each Government-official defendant, through the official's own individual actions, has violated the Constitution.").

Moreover, "[f]or purposes of liability, a suit against a public official in his official capacity is in effect a suit against the local government entity he represents." Mairena v. Foti, 816 F.2d 1061, 1064 (5th Cir. 1987) (citations omitted). The Supreme Court has held that in order for a local governmental entity to have liability under Section 1983, a plaintiff must prove that a policy, custom, or practice of that local government entity was the "moving force" behind the constitutional violation. Monell v. Dep't of Social Servs., 436 U.S. 658, 694 (1978).

Paul Sharpe

Plaintiff alleges a claim against Paul Sharpe for excessive force in violation of the Eighth Amendment. Specifically, Plaintiff claims that on July 11, 2012, Officer Sharpe, unprovoked, grabbed him by the throat and shoved him. As a result of the alleged assault, Plaintiff suffered scratches, swelling, and tenderness.

Officer Evans claims he is entitled to qualified immunity. Officer Evans is "entitled to qualified immunity unless the plaintiff demonstrates that (1) the defendant violated the plaintiff's constitutional rights and (2) the defendant's actions were objectively unreasonable in light of clearly established law at the time of the violation." Porter v. Epps , 659 F.3d 440, 445 (5th Cir. 2011) (citing Freeman v. Gore, 483 F.3d 404, 410-11 (5th Cir. 2007))

It was clearly established at the time of the incident at issue that inmates have a constitutional right to be free from the use of excessive force. See Anthony v. Martinez, 185 F.Appx. 360, 363 (5th Cir. 2006); Hudson v. McMillian, 503 U.S. 1 (1992). However, "[t]he Eighth Amendment's prohibition of cruel and unusual punishments necessarily excludes from constitutional recognition de minimis uses of physical force, provided that the use of force is not of a sort repugnant to the conscience of mankind." Hudson, 503 U.S. at 9-10 (internal citations and quotations omitted). The "core judicial inquiry" when deciding whether an excessive force claim violates the ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.