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Jenkins v. Trustmark National Bank

United States District Court, Fifth Circuit

October 11, 2013

LEROY JENKINS, individually and on behalf of all persons similarly situated, Plaintiff,
v.
TRUSTMARK NATIONAL BANK, Defendant.

ORDER PRELIMINARILY APPROVING CLASS SETTLEMENT AND CERTIFYING SETTLEMENT CLASS

DANIEL P. JORDAN, III, District Judge.

Plaintiffs and Trustmark National Bank ("Trustmark" or "the Bank") have agreed to a settlement, the terms and conditions of which are set forth in an executed Settlement Agreement and Release (the "Settlement"). The parties reached the Settlement through arm's-length negotiations following two court-ordered settlement conferences with United States Magistrate Judge F. Keith Ball. Under the Settlement, subject to the terms and conditions therein and subject to Court approval, Plaintiffs and the proposed Settlement Class would fully, finally, and forever resolve, discharge, and release their claims in exchange for Trustmark's payment of Four Million and 00/100 Dollars ($4, 000, 000.00), without admission of liability by Trustmark, inclusive of all attorneys' fees and costs to Class Counsel and Service Awards to Plaintiffs, to create a common fund to benefit the Settlement Class. In addition, Trustmark has agreed to adhere to its current method of time-ordered posting for non-recurring POS and ATM debit transactions for two years following the Effective Date, and to pay all fees and costs associated with providing notice to the Settlement Class and for Settlement Administrator implementation of the Settlement.

The Settlement has been filed with the Court, and Plaintiffs and Class Counsel filed an Unopposed Motion for Preliminary Approval of Class Settlement and for Certification of the Settlement Class (the "Motion"). Upon considering the Motion and exhibits thereto, the Settlement, the record in these proceedings, the representations and recommendations of Class Counsel, and the requirements of law, the Court finds that: (1) this Court has jurisdiction over the subject matter and parties to these proceedings; (2) the proposed Settlement Class meets the requirements of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23 and should be certified for settlement purposes only; (3) the persons and entities identified below should be appointed Class Representatives and Class Counsel; (4) the Settlement is the result of informed, good-faith, arm's-length negotiations between the parties and their capable and experienced counsel and is not the result of collusion; (5) the Settlement is within the range of reasonableness and should be preliminarily approved; (6) the proposed Notice Program and proposed forms of Notice satisfy Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23 and constitutional due process requirements, and are reasonably calculated under the circumstances to apprise the Settlement Class of the pendency of the Action, class certification, the terms of the Settlement, Class Counsel's application for an award of attorneys' fees and expenses ("Fee Application") and request for Service Awards for Plaintiffs, and their rights to opt-out of the Settlement Class and object to the Settlement, Class Counsel's Fee Application, and/or the request for Service Awards for Plaintiffs; (7) good cause exists to schedule and conduct a Final Approval Hearing, pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23(e), to assist the Court in determining whether to grant final approval of the Settlement and enter Final Judgment, and whether to grant Class Counsel's Fee Application and request for Service Awards for Plaintiffs; and (8) the other related matters pertinent to the preliminary approval of the Settlement should also be approved.

Based on the foregoing, IT IS HEREBY ORDERED AND ADJUDGED as follows:

1. As used in this Order, capitalized terms shall have the definitions and meanings accorded to them in the Settlement.

2. The Court has jurisdiction over the subject matter and parties to this proceeding pursuant to 28 U.S.C. §§ 1331, 1337.

3. Venue is proper in this District.

Provisional Class Certification and Appointment of Class Representatives and Class Counsel

4. In deciding whether to provisionally certify a settlement class, a court must consider the same factors that it would consider in connection with a proposed litigation class - i.e., all Rule 23(a) factors and at least one subsection of Rule 23(b) must be satisfied - except that the Court need not consider the manageability of a potential trial, since the settlement, if approved, would obviate the need for a trial. Amchem Products, Inc. v. Windsor, 521 U.S. 591, 620 (1997); Cotton v. Hinton, 559 F.2d 1326, 1331 (5th Cir. 1977).

5. The Court finds, for settlement purposes, that the Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23 factors are present and that certification of the proposed Settlement Class is appropriate under Rule 23. The Court, therefore, provisionally certifies the following Settlement Class:

All holders of a Trustmark Account who from September 28, 2005 through and including the date of this Order, incurred one or more Overdraft or NSF Fees as a result of Trustmark's Debit Sequencing Overdraft Practices. Excluded from the Class are all current Trustmark employees, officers and directors, and the judges presiding over this Action.

6. Specifically, the Court finds, for settlement purposes, that the Settlement Class satisfies the following factors of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23:

(a) Numerosity: In the Action there are thousands of Class members in at least four states (Mississippi, Tennessee, Florida and Texas). Their joinder is impracticable. Thus, the Rule 23(a)(1) numerosity requirement is met. See Pederson v. La. State Univ., 213 F.3d 858, 868 (5th Cir. 2000); Mullen v. Treasure Chest Casino, LLC, 186 F.3d 620, 624 (5th Cir. 1999) (numerosity satisfied where it would be difficult or inconvenient to join all of the class members).

(b) Commonality: The threshold for commonality under Rule 23(a)(2) is not high. The bar for proving commonality is met when there is at least one issue whose resolution will affect all or a significant number of the putative class members. Forbush v. J.C. Penney Co., 994 F.2d 1101, 1106 (5th Cir. 1993). This Action satisfies the commonality requirement because there are many questions of law and fact common to the Settlement Class that center on Trustmark's systematic Debit Sequencing Overdraft Practices. See Fed.R.Civ.P. 23(a) (2); see also In re Checking Account Overdraft Litig., 275 F.R.D. 666 (S.D. Fla. 2011), pet. for leave to appeal denied, No. 11-90012 (11th Cir. Oct. 7, 2011). There are multiple questions of law and fact that center on Trustmark's class-wide policies and practices and are common to the Settlement Class.

(c) Typicality: Plaintiffs' claims are typical of the Settlement Class for purposes of this settlement because they concern the same alleged Trustmark policies and practices, arise from the same legal theories, and allege the same types of harm and entitlement to relief. Rule 23(a)(3) is therefore satisfied. See James v. City of Dallas, 254 F.3d 551, 571 (5th Cir. 2001) (for the typicality prong, "the critical inquiry is whether the class representative's claims have the same essential characteristics of those of the putative class.").

(d) Adequacy: Adequacy under Rule 23(a)(4) relates to: (1) whether the proposed class representatives have interests antagonistic to the Settlement Class; and (2) whether the proposed class counsel has the competence to undertake the litigation at issue. See Stirman v. Exxon Corp., 280 F.3d 554, 563 (5th Cir. 2002). Rule 23(a)(4) is satisfied here because there are no conflicts of interest between the Plaintiffs and the Settlement Class, and Plaintiffs have retained competent counsel to represent them and the Settlement Class. Class Counsel here regularly engage in consumer class litigation and other complex litigation similar to the present Action, and have dedicated substantial resources to prosecuting the Action. Moreover, the Plaintiffs and Class Counsel have vigorously and competently represented the Settlement Class Members' interests in the Action.

(e) Predominance and Superiority: Rule 23(b)(3) is satisfied for settlement purposes, as well, because the common legal and alleged factual issues here predominate over individualized issues, and resolution of the common issues for thousands of Settlement Class Members in a single, coordinated proceeding is superior to many individual lawsuits addressing the same legal and factual issues. With respect to predominance, Rule 23(b)(3) requires that "the questions of law or fact common to class members predominate over any questions affecting only individual members, and a class action is superior to other available methods for fairly and efficiently adjudicating the controversy." FED. R. CIV. PROC. 23(b)(3); Unger v. Amedisys Inc., 401 F.3d 316, 320 (5th Cir. 2005) ("Predominance" is satisfied where questions of law or fact common to the members of the class "predominate over any questions affecting only individual members."). Based on the record currently before the Court, the predominance requirement is satisfied here for settlement purposes because common questions present a significant aspect of the case and can be resolved for all Settlement Class Members in a single common judgment.

7. The Court appoints the following persons as Class Representatives: Leroy Jenkins, Kathy White, J.C. Bush, Regina Bush, Latonya Earls, David Proctor, and Shannon Proctor.

8. The Court appoints the following persons and entities as Class Counsel who shall be responsible for handling all Settlement-related matters on behalf of Plaintiffs and the Settlement Class:

Preliminary Approval of the Settlement

9. At the preliminary approval stage, the Court's task is to evaluate whether the Settlement is within the "range of reasonableness." 4 Newberg on Class Actions § 11.26 (4th ed. 2010). Preliminary approval is appropriate where the proposed settlement is the result of the parties' good faith negotiations, there are no obvious deficiencies, and the settlement falls within the range of reason. Settlement negotiations that involve arm's-length, informed bargaining with the aid of experienced counsel support a preliminary finding of fairness. See Manual for Complex Litigation, Third, § 30.42 (West 1995) ("A presumption of fairness, adequacy, and reasonableness may attach to a class settlement reached in arm's-length negotiations between experienced, capable counsel after meaningful discovery.") (internal quotation marks omitted).

10. The Court preliminarily approves the Settlement, and the exhibits appended to the Motion, as fair, reasonable and adequate. The Court finds that the Settlement was reached in the absence of collusion, and is the product of informed, good-faith, arm's-length negotiations between the parties, and their capable and experienced counsel under the supervision of Magistrate Judge Ball. The Court further finds that the Settlement, including the exhibits appended to the Motion, is within the range of reasonableness and possible judicial approval, such that: (a) a presumption of fairness is appropriate for the purposes of preliminary settlement approval; and (b) it is appropriate to effectuate notice to the Settlement Class, as set forth below and in the Settlement, and schedule a Final Approval Hearing to assist the Court in determining whether to grant Final Approval to the Settlement and enter final judgment.

Approval of Notice and Notice Program and Direction to Effectuate Notice

11. The Court approves the form and content of the Notice to be provided to the Settlement Class, substantially in the forms appended as Exhibits A(1) - A(3) to the Joint Declaration. The Court further finds that the Notice Program, described in Section VIII of the Settlement, is the best practicable under the circumstances. The Notice Program is reasonably calculated under the circumstances to apprise the Settlement Class of the pendency of the Action, class certification, the terms of the Settlement, their rights to opt-out of the Settlement Class and object to the Settlement, Class Counsel's Fee Application, and the request for Service Awards for Plaintiffs. The Notice and Notice Program constitute sufficient notice to all persons entitled to ...


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