Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

The Mississippi Bar v. Collins

Supreme Court of Mississippi, En Banc

August 15, 2013

THE MISSISSIPPI BAR
v.
JIMMIE L. COLLINS

ATTORNEY FOR APPELLANT: JAMES R. CLARK.

ATTORNEY FOR APPELLEE: JIMMIE L. COLLINS, PRO.

Dickinson, Presiding Justice.

¶1. The Mississippi Bar filed a Formal Complaint seeking to disbar Jimmie Collins due to a 1989 felony conviction. But, because disbarring an attorney approximately twenty-four years after his conviction and thirteen years after the Mississippi Bar restored him from inactive to active status, fails to serve the purposes of the Rules of Discipline, we deny the Bar's request for disbarment.

FACTS AND PROCEDURAL HISTORY

¶2. On December 27, 2012, the Mississippi Bar filed a Formal Complaint seeking the disbarment of Jimmie L. Collins pursuant to Rule 6 of the Rules of Discipline for the Mississippi State Bar. The Bar alleges that Collins, on or about July 20, 1989, was convicted of aggravated assault in the District Court of Fulton County, Georgia. A certified copy of the conviction and the indictment were attached to the Formal Complaint. The Bar also requested that Collins be taxed with all costs and expenses, pursuant to Rule 27(a).

¶3. Collins was served with the Complaint and Summons on February 5, 2013, and was ordered to respond within thirty days. He filed his answer and motion to dismiss on February 26, 2013, in which he admitted that he had been guilty of the crime, but denied that he should be disbarred from the practice of law. He argues that the Complaint should be dismissed because it "fails to state a cause for which relief can be granted." And, according to Collins, at the time of the conviction, his Mississippi Bar license was on inactive status.[1]

¶4. Collins states that, when he applied for reinstatement, he never concealed or misrepresented the truth about this felony conviction, and that, in his application for reinstatement to the practice of law, he answered all questions truthfully and was placed back on active status in 2000. Collins currently serves as the chair of the Senior Lawyers Section of the Mississippi Bar Association.

LAW AND ANALYSIS

¶5. This Court holds exclusive jurisdiction over bar disciplinary matters.[2] "We conduct a de novo review in cases involving the discipline of attorneys."[3] The Bar has the burden of proving an attorney's misconduct by clear and convincing evidence.[4]

¶6. Rule 6 of the Rules of Discipline for the Mississippi Bar provides for disbarment when "any attorney subject to the disciplinary jurisdiction of the Court" is "convicted in any court of any state or in any federal court . . . of any felony (other than manslaughter) or of any misdemeanor involving fraud, dishonesty, misrepresentation . . . ."[5] Collins admitted that he was convicted for aggravated assault in 1989. Further, the Bar presented the Court with a certified copy of this conviction. Under Rule 6(a), the certified copy of the conviction "shall be deemed conclusive evidence thereof" and the "Court shall then forthwith strike the name of the attorney and order his immediate suspension from the practice of law."[6]¶7. Once the Bar shows that the time for appeal has expired or that all appeals were exhausted without reversal, Rule 6(d) requires automatic disbarment.[7] Collins also admitted that the time for appeal has passed without a resolution in his favor. However, for reasons discussed below, we decline to disbar Collins for this offense.

¶8. This Court "is the ultimate judge of matters arising under the Rules of Discipline for the Mississippi Bar."[8] In Broome v. Mississippi Bar, this Court's order suspending Broome for thirty days provided for automatic reinstatement.[9] At that time, Rule 12(a) allowed for reinstatement of an attorney suspended from the practice of law only upon petition. We held, however, that providing for automatic reinstatement, in contravention of Rule 12, was "within the scope of this Court's exclusive and inherent jurisdiction of attorney discipline matters" and we ordered accordingly.[10]

¶9. The purpose of attorney discipline "is not to punish the guilty attorney, but to protect the public, the administration of justice, to maintain appropriate professional standards, and to deter similar conduct."[11] The application and enforcement of this rule – under the facts and circumstances of this particular case – does little to protect the integrity of the legal profession, nor would it have a deterrent effect.

ΒΆ10. This conviction is twenty-four years old. As a convicted felon, Collins has been allowed to hold a Mississippi bar license, to actively practice law in Mississippi for the past thirteen years, and even to hold office within the Mississippi Bar Association. The Bar does not allege that Collins has violated any other ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.