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JAMES LEE TOLBERT v. STATE OF MISSISSIPPI

DECEMBER 21, 1983

JAMES LEE TOLBERT
v.
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI



BEFORE PATTERSON, C.J., HAWKINS and ROBERTSON, JJ.

HAWKINS, JUSTICE, FOR THE COURT:

James Lee Tolbert was convicted of the crime of murder in the Circuit Court of Alcorn County and sentenced to a term of life in the Mississippi Department of Corrections.

It is only necessary for us to address one assigned error on this appeal, the failure of the state to furnish the defendant copies of statements made by the defendant after a court order to do so, but instead reserving these statements for impeachment purposes. Finding this to be reversible error. We reverse and remand.

 On March 23, 1981, Tolbert shot and killed Annie Katherine Boyd Cox with a pistol. Contrary to his contention on appeal, the evidence supports his conviction of murder.

 On May 19, 1981, Tolbert's counsel filed a motion for production of documents. The motion was sustained by order of the Court dated May 22, 1981, which directed the state, among other things, to produce for inspection "any and all written documents or statements which the Defendant is alleged to have made in this cause which might be construed as a confession or admission of the crime charged . . ."

 One of the eyewitnesses to the slaying was Carolyn Brand. In cooperation with law enforcement officers, but unknown to Tolbert, she tape recorded three conversations

 with him, one in July, another in August, and the final on the eve of the trial in October, 1981. These recordings contained incriminating statements by Tolbert, encouraging her to testify in his favor.

 At the trial, when Tolbert took the stand in his own defense, the state laid a predicate for the admission of the tapes by asking him if he had made certain statements to Brand, which he strongly denied.

 In rebuttal, the state offered transcriptions of the tape into evidence.

 Before the statements were offered to the jury, Brand testified in rebuttal that Tolbert contacted her in July, 1981, and when she went to see him he wanted her to change her testimony. According to her she was scared of him and promised to do so. When she left, however, she quite properly reported the matter to the law enforcement officers who arranged to make tape recordings of subsequent conversations she would have with Tolbert.

 Two of the recorded conversations were over the telephone, another when they met person-to-person.

 Counsel objected to the introduction of transcriptions of the tapes as being violative of federal law, entrapment, but strangely did not list as a reason for his objection that to do so violated the order of the Court.

 The circuit judge, however, did consider this point in his ruling, and held the state was not required to produce a "transcribed rendition of the taped conversations since they were to be used in rebuttal."

 The Court did exclude one of the transcriptions, but for another reason. Relevant portions of the transcriptions of the remaining recorded conversations were admitted into ...


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